Dr. ANTHONY PICCIANO
Professor and Executive Officer PhD Program in Urban Education
365 Fifth Ave. NYC, NY 10016 212-817-8281 apicciano@gc.cuny.edu
About Dr. Anthony Picciano
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RECENT RESEARCH

Picciano, A.G., Seaman, J. and Chu, A.H. (2009-2013) conducted a study and evaluation of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program (1991-2009). See: Picciano, Anthony G. (2013). Pioneering Higher Education's Digital Future: An Evaluation of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program (1992-2012). Monograph.

Picciano, A.G.,Seaman, J. and Day, S. (2011). Conducted a study of high school principals in the State of Illinois on the extent and nature of online learning. This work was sponsored by the Illinois Principals Association.

Picciano, A.G., Seaman, J. and Chu, A.H. (2009-2012) are presently conducting a study and evaluation of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program (1991-2009). This project will run through 2012.

Picciano, A.G. & Seaman, J. (2009-2010). Class Connections: High School Reform and the Role of Online Online Learning. Jeff Seaman and I conducted a national study of high school principals examining the role that online learning was playing in their schools. See: http://www.babson.edu/Academics/Documents/babson-survey-research-group/class-connections.pdf

Picciano, A.G. & Chu, A.H. (2009-2010). Haiwen Chu (a doctoral student in the Urban Education program at the CUNY Graduate Center) and I are presently conducting a study and evaluation of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Anytime, Anyplace Learning Program (1991-2009).

Picciano, A.G. (2008-2009). A member of the planning committee for a workshop on blended learning in American colleges and universities. The theme for this workshop was Blending with Purpose: The Multimodal Approach, which was a model I developed for designing blended learning environments. Participants in this workshop developed a series of papers that resulted in a special edition of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks.

Picciano, A.G. & Seaman, J. (2008-2009). K–12 Online Learning: A 2008 Follow-Up of the Survey of U.S. School District Administrators. Needham, MA: The Sloan Consortium. My colleague Jeff Seaman and I conducted a follow-up to the national study conducted in 2006-2007 on the extent and nature of online and blended learning in K-12 school districts. The major purposes of this follow-up was to collect a larger sample and to validate the findings of our earlier study.

Picciano, A.G. & Thompson, R. (2008-2009). Online Learning in Higher Education: A Survey of New York City Metropolitan Area Colleges and Universities. Rachel Thompson (a doctoral student in the Urban Education program at CUNY Graduate Center) and I examined the extent and nature of online and blended learning in colleges and universities in the New York City metropolitan area.

Picciano, A.G. (Ed.) (2006-2007). I coordinated the collection of a series of articles based on original research on online learning in K-12 school environments and teacher education. The result of this activity was a special edition of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks. Vol. 11 (3). Needham, MA: The Sloan Consortium. Picciano, A.G. & Seaman, J. (2006-2007). K-12 online learning: A survey of U.S. school district administrators. Needham, MA: The Sloan Consortium. My colleague Jeff Seaman and I examined the extent and nature of online and blended learning in K-12 school districts. It was the first such study that differentiated online and blended learning for this population.

Picciano, A.G. & Dzuiban, C. (2005-2007)
. My colleague Chuck Dzuiban and I conceived and coordinated a series of studies on blended learning in American colleges and universities. Twenty-five researchers from around the country involved with twelve studies contributed to this research project. The result of this activity was a book: Blended Learning: Research Perspectives (The Sloan Consortium).

Picciano, A.G. (2001-2002). I conducted a study of student perceptions and outcomes in an online course. It was one of the first such studies to move beyond student perceptions of their learning in an online course and to assess authentic student outcomes as determined by the instructor’s course goals and objectives. The result of this work was an article, Beyond student perceptions: Issues of interaction, presence, and performance in an online course. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 6(1). This was the most read JALN article of the year 2005 and continues to be one of the most popular articles ever published in JALN.

 

 

 

 
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